• Comparisons

2018 Honda HR-V vs. 2018 Toyota C-HR

By Autolist Staff | September 14, 2018

2018 Honda HR-V

2018 Toyota C-HR

Automotive Website Analyzed


67%

Satisfactory

Maybe buy it

87%

Really Good

You should buy it

Our User's Take

What owners think


33%

Would Buy Again

3 Ratings

No Ratings Yet.
Would you buy it again?
Review this car

What’s better about the Honda HR-V?

All-wheel-drive. The Honda HR-V comes with optional all-wheel-drive, a feature that the C-HR doesn’t even offer. This can be a big deal for buyers in colder climates dealing with slippery roads in the winter.

Room. Despite being about two inches shorter overall than the Toyota C-HR, the Honda HR-V is a marvel of packaging. Inside, the Honda boasts considerably more passenger space and cargo space than the Toyota. This is a crucial advantage.

Efficiency. A front-wheel-drive HR-V is rated at 28/34/21 MPG city/highway/combined, a few clicks higher than the C-HR’s rating of 27/31/29 MPG.

More options. Honda offers five trim levels of the HR-V while Toyota only offers two trim levels on the C-HR. Thus, Honda buyers have more choices of features to it their budget.

What’s better about the Toyota C-HR?

Refinement. Neither of these vehicles is a luxury CUV but the Toyota has a nice amount of comfort and quiet built into the cabin. The materials and the sound deadening have an upscale feel to them that the HR-V lacks.

More fun. While the two models have roughly the same amount of horsepower (144 horsepower for the Toyota and 141 for the Honda) the Toyota has more torque (139 pound-feet versus the Honda’s 127 pound-feet). This helps the C-HR feel more fun to drive around town than the HR-V -- so too does better steering feel and overall handling.

Style. While some find the C-HR’s design to be too aggressive, we liked it -- and we liked it more than the homely HR-V.

Autolist’s take:

The Toyota C-HR is a commendable vehicle with great styling, refinement and handling. But the Honda HR-V succeeds where buyers need it to: it’s the most practical subcompact crossover on the market with the most useable interior, plus it beats the Toyota for fuel economy and offers optional all-wheel-drive. This makes it an easy choice for us: we say Buy the Honda.

Cost of Ownership

2018 Honda HR-V

2018 Toyota C-HR

Annual Fuel Costs

$1,415
15k miles at $2.642/gal
$1,367
15k miles at $2.642/gal
Fuel Economy

25 mpg (miles per gallon)
City
27 mpg (miles per gallon)
City
31 mpg (miles per gallon)
Highway
31 mpg (miles per gallon)
Highway

Safety

2018 Honda HR-V

2018 Toyota C-HR

NHTSA Crash Test Results

5 stars
Overall
5 stars
Overall
Safety Features

-
Autonomous Braking
Standard
Autonomous Braking
-
Blind-Spot Warnings
Available
Blind-Spot Warnings
Standard
Adaptive Cruise Control
Standard
Adaptive Cruise Control
-
Lane-Keep Assist
Standard
Lane-Keep Assist
-
Cross-Traffic Alert
Available
Cross-Traffic Alert

Interior

2018 Honda HR-V

2018 Toyota C-HR

Interior Features

-
Leather
-
Leather
Available
Moonroof
-
Moonroof
Available
Heated Seats
Available
Heated Seats
Available
Keyless Entry
Available
Keyless Entry
Available
Climate Control
Standard
Climate Control
Technology

-
Apple Carplay
-
Apple Carplay
-
Android Auto
-
Android Auto
Available
Satellite Radio
-
Satellite Radio
Standard
Bluetooth
Standard
Bluetooth
Available
Navigation System
-
Navigation System

Under the Hood

2018 Honda HR-V

2018 Toyota C-HR

Powertrain

6-Speed Manual
Transmission
7-Speed Shiftable CVT
Transmission
FWD
Drivetrain
FWD
Drivetrain
Drivetrain

141+ HP @ 6500 RPM
Horsepower
144+ HP @ 6100 RPM
Horsepower
127+ lb-ft @ 4300 RPM
Torque
139+ lb-ft @ 3900 RPM
Torque
I4
Cylinders
I4
Cylinders