2013 Volkswagen Beetle
40,710 Miles | Irvine, CA
$14,498
Est $209/mo

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2014 Volkswagen Beetle
33,823 Miles | Des Plaines, IL
$13,855
Est $200/mo

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2018 Volkswagen Beetle
998 Miles | Orlando, FL
$17,999
Est $259/mo

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2016 Volkswagen Beetle
23,851 Miles | North Lauderdale, FL
$13,299
Est $192/mo

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2018 Volkswagen Beetle
6,175 Miles | North Lauderdale, FL
$14,999
Est $216/mo

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2014 Volkswagen Beetle
40,029 Miles | West Palm Beach , FL
$13,699
Est $197/mo

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2014 Volkswagen Beetle
29,502 Miles | West Palm Beach , FL
$13,397
Est $193/mo

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2015 Volkswagen Beetle
23,526 Miles | Margate, FL
$11,899
Est $172/mo

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2015 Volkswagen Beetle
51,452 Miles | West Palm Beach , FL
$11,499
Est $166/mo

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2018 Volkswagen Beetle
12,980 Miles | West Palm Beach , FL
$15,499
Est $223/mo

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2014 Volkswagen Beetle
37,636 Miles | Miami, FL
$15,698
Est $226/mo

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2015 Volkswagen Beetle
26,694 Miles | West Palm Beach , FL
$15,598
Est $225/mo

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2012 Volkswagen Beetle
62,784 Miles | Commerce, CA
$8,175
Est $118/mo

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2014 Volkswagen Beetle
43,566 Miles | Commerce, CA
$11,675
Est $168/mo

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2012 Volkswagen Beetle
83,296 Miles | Commerce, CA
$10,675
Est $154/mo

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2015 Volkswagen Beetle
41,203 Miles | Oceanside, CA
$15,550
Est $224/mo

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2013 Volkswagen Beetle
53,061 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$11,870
Est $171/mo

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2014 Volkswagen Beetle
56,209 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$10,600
Est $153/mo

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2014 Volkswagen Beetle
34,751 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$11,765
Est $170/mo

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2012 Volkswagen Beetle
38,980 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$10,600
Est $153/mo

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Volkswagen Beetle Buyer's Guide

Owner Reviews
4.1
65 Reviews
Overall
4.1
Value
4.0
Performance
3.7
Style
4.5
Comfort
4.1
Fuel Economy
4.1
Reliability
3.5

Volkswagen Beetle Owner Ratings & Reviews

Write a Review

2012 Volkswagen Beetle - A Couple of Growing Pains

AJ
Bainbridge Island, Washington
Overall
4.0
Value
4.0
Performance
3.0
Style
5.0
Comfort
3.0
Fuel Economy
2.0
Reliability
3.0
I was so excited when the redesigned beetle debuted in 2012 that I bought it within the first few months. I regretted this pretty quickly as I noticed some issues within the first couple of weeks. For example, the curved windows would not roll up all the way. I researched online and found this to be a common issue. Volkswagen repaired them with no questions asked because they acknowledged how common it was and that it was the design of the cars fault. It became very inconvenient as I needed mine replaced multiple times. I imagine this has been fixed in the newer versions. Other than that I love the look and feel of this car. The price is a little expensive but that goes with the novelty of owning a beetle compared to other typical compact cars. The gas mileage is less than average and ... (more)
Story
I loved that I was one of the first to buy the new redesigned Volkswagen beetles. I would often get stopped by people telling me they loved my car. It is always nice because it is easy to park in a big city.
Pros
My favorite features are the way it drives and the feel of the interior. It feels so smooth when driving. It is quiet and handles nicely. Do not have to put your foot to the floor to reach highway speeds. Also the interior has nice leather details and lots of headroom in the driver and passenger seat.
Cons
The curved windows can be a headache. The windows roll down automatically a little when getting out of the car and then when you shut the door roll back up into the top of the car. This can be frustrating when they get stuck. Also the MPG is not up to par with other smaller cars on the market.

2004 Volkswagen Beetle - Great Starter Car

Krystal
Cape Coral, Florida
Overall
3.0
Value
4.0
Performance
3.0
Style
5.0
Comfort
4.0
Fuel Economy
3.0
Reliability
3.0
I bought this car when I was a senior in high school and used it all the way through to my sophomore year of college. It was the perfect car for me, the convertible top made it so much fun to drive around all year in Florida. It was small, which made it easy for a short person like me to drive, but big enough that I could have friends in the back seat. And for such a cute car, it had some seriously good pickup. Unfortunately toward the end, it just wouldn't start sometimes. I would try to go to work, and it would start and we couldn't jump it. We would take it in to the hop and they would say they can't find anything wrong with it. Eventually we had to sell it because I couldn't risk having to miss work if my roommates weren't around to take me if the car wouldn't start.
Story
My last day of high school, I put the top down and drove to the beach with some friends. The feeling I got was just so happy.
Pros
Convertible top Really cute Good Size Comfortable to sit in and drive Decent fuel efficiency Not a bad price. Especially for a college student
Cons
Sometimes wouldn't start, couldn't figure out what was wrong with it The convertible top was manual A lot of shops refused to work on it because it was a Volkswagen so I had to take it to dealership which usually cost a lot more

2000 Volkswagen Beetle - Its reliable

samantha
Shaker Heights, Ohio
Overall
3.0
Value
3.0
Performance
3.0
Style
4.0
Comfort
2.0
Fuel Economy
4.0
Reliability
4.0
I have a 2000 beetle. I bought it when I was 19 and I am 21 now and have had a few problems but not many. I got it used from an old woman who did not really drive it at all so there was only like 3000 miles on it. It's really low to the ground so every bump and crack I can feel.
Story
The night me and my friends spent the day before I left for college was pretty memorable. We basically drove around all day and around the city and just spent time together before we all went our own ways.
Pros
Gas is great. I go to school two hours away from my house and I can make it there on a half of tank of gas.
Cons
Super small not really useful of you are moving a lot of stuff. The parts that are positions under the hood are really weird. A lot of the stuff are stacked over stuff so sometimes changing your window wiper fluid or other simple tasks like that is hard because you have to take stuff apart to get to it. Also super low to the ground.

Volkswagen Beetle Generations

One Long Generation of the VW Beetle

The Volkswagen Beetle originally made its U.S. debut in 1950 and it has been surprisingly distinct ever since. The original model remained in production until after the turn of the century, with an appearance that remained largely unchanged. This two-door icon featured the engine in the back with the trunk up front and was the longest-running design on a single platform of any car ever manufactured, with over 21 million made over the course of 65 years. VW revived the model in 1997 as a front-engine, compact, two-door hatchback or convertible and subsequently sold two generations of this modern version. It won't be produced after July 2019.

Beetle A5 (2011-2019)

The style on this second-generation modern Beetle featured a lower profile but it still kept a shape reminiscent of the original Type 1. Built on the same platform as its predecessor the New Beetle, this final generation was also longer and wider than before.

This generation also remained a front-wheel-drive model with its engine in the front. In 2013 VW released the convertible version of this generation. The previous TDI and 2.0-liter engines were joined by a base five-cylinder model that made 168 horsepower.

Available transmissions for gasoline models were a five-speed manual or a six-speed automatic while the diesel models offered the option of a six-speed dual-clutch transmission. In 2015 the base 2.5-liter straight five-cylinder engine was replaced by a turbocharged, 1.8-liter four-cylinder TSI.

For the 2018 model year, VW dropped that 1.8-liter engine in favor of a different 2.0-liter turbo that makes 174 horsepower. For 2018 and 2019, this was the only engine offered in the Beetle.

On September 13, 2018 Volkswagen announced that the Beetle would no longer be produced after July of 2019.

New Beetle (1997-2010)

The New Beetle revived the Beetle nameplate for the U.S. market after nearly two decades of absence.

The revival marked a dramatic change from the original in that it was now front-engine and front-wheel-drive, a move intended to pull the Beetle into the modern era.

This first-generation of the modern Beetle rode on a platform it shared with VW's compact Golf hatchback and while it was significantly larger than the original model, its retro-themed styling and iconic silhouette clearly identified it as a Beetle.

Design parallels include the separate fenders and remnants of running boards as well as the high, rounded roof, sloping headlights and large, rounded tail lights.

Under the hood, choices included the base model’s 115-horsepower, 2.0-liter inline four, an optional 100-horsepower 1.9-liter turbodiesel inline four or an optional 1.8-liter turbo four-cylinder that made 150 horsepower in the Turbo and Sport models.

A Turbo S model that was available from 2002-2004 had a 1.8-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder that made 180-horsepower engine; it was mated to a six-speed manual transmission. This car also had a sport suspension and aluminum interior trim. 1.8-liter turbos and the Turbo S line had retractable rear spoilers.

In 2003, VW added convertible to the lineup.

In 2006 the exterior was redesigned. The new look came with a new 2.5-liter, four-cylinder base engine.

Type 1 General overview (1950-1979)

The two-door Beetle from the long-running classic generation had a 34 horsepower air-cooled 1.6-liter flat four-cylinder engine, rear-wheel-drive and a four-speed manual transmission that got 36 mpg.

The windshield was completely flat, and the original rear windows were a split design. The Beetle had mechanical drum brakes and turn signals as well as a non-synchronized gearbox.

In 1960 a hydraulic damper was added to improve steering. In 1961 Volkswagen offered an optional semi-automatic transmission which had an electromagnetic clutch and it used a centrifugal clutch for idling – although these were rare in the US.

In 1968 the “Auto-Stick” was introduced. This was a three-speed manual with a vacuum-operated electro-pneumatic clutch. The top of the gear shift performed the clutch function, instead of a foot pedal. A torque converter in the transmission allowed the car to start and stop in any gear.

Inside the car was a metal dash, with a consolidated instrument panel. The front seats were adjustable, and the rear seat could be folded down. Front windows had vent windows which pivoted; swing-out rear windows were an option. The Beetle was heated through a manifold that brought the heat directly from the engine, and the windshield wipers were operated via air pressure from the spare tire.

Convertible

From 1948-1980, Volkswagen sold over 300,000 of the carbriolet-style convertible cars. Distinguishing features include rear stone shields and fancy wheel trim rings. This car also had reinforced sills and double-walled side cowl-panels which sat below the dash panel. The doors also differed, in that they had B-pillar situated secondary alignment wedges as well as curved gussets at the lower corners of the openings. The folding top was insulated, and it had a rear window of safety glass. After 1968 the rear window was heated. The interior had a passenger side vanity mirror on the visor as well as two ashtrays and map pockets in the back seat. Because the folded-down top was rather tall, the rear-view mirror could be shifted on a pivot to see over it.

1950s

Hydraulic brakes were added as an option, and the rear window was changed from a split design to a single oval.

In 1953 the instrument panel got a makeover, and the brake lights and license plate light were changed. 1954 saw changes that increased the horsepower 36. In 1955 the separate brake lights were eliminated in favor of a combined tail-light. The turn signals were changed, too. 1956 was the year that the twin chrome tailpipes were introduced and the bumper guards were enlarged. 1958 brought another revision to the instrument panel along with a rectangular rear window.

1960s

A front anti-roll bar was added, and so was a hydraulic steering damper. Another engine change brought the horsepower up to 40, and a choke was added to the Solex carburetor. The transmission became synchronized on forward gears.

Changes for 1962 included a mechanical fuel gauge and larger tail lights. The windshield washer type was changed to one that used a rechargeable air compressor.

In 1965 significant revisions were made to the body that resulted in larger windows, and the flat windshield received a slight curve.

In 1966 Volkswagen offered an optional 50-horsepower engine which became standard for North America, likewise with 1967’s 53-horsepower engine. The generator was strengthened from 180 watts to 360 and the electrical system boosted from 6 to 12 volts.

The driver’s side now had a mirror and an armrest on the door, while both doors got a lock button. Other changes included two-speed windshield wipers to comply with newly revised safety standards, which were changes to the headlights and the addition of dual-circuit brakes.

In 1968 the bumpers were mounted higher and the tail-lights were enlarged to make room for the reverse signal lamps. An externally located spring-loaded gas cap replaced the one that used to be inside the trunk, and a ventilation system brought fresh air into the cabin through the front deck lid. The gear shifter was made shorter to optimize shifting.

More safety-related changes were made. Trigger-equipped outside door handles and a secondary front hood latch were added. A collapsing steering column and changes to the vent window and glove compartment latches topped the interior changes, along with adding pictures to the knobs on the instrument panel. The most notable change was the introduction of high-backed bucket seats.

1969 Beetle got a heated rear window and day/night mirror as well as a semi-trailing independent suspension that had double-jointed swing axles.

1970s

In 1970, the L package included some of the goodies that were in the cabriolet such as two ashtrays and map pockets in the rear seating area as well as the vanity mirror on the passenger’s side up front. 1971 brought improvements to the ventilation system and a 60 horsepower engine.

Volkswagen made changes in 1972 that made the Beetle’s rear window larger. This was also the year that the steering wheel was changed to one with four spokes that absorbed energy. Also, the windshield wipers were now controlled by a stick on the steering column rather than a knob on the dashboard.

1973 Beetles received further changes to the tail-lights and rear fenders, and the generator was replaced by an alternator. The windshield gained more of a curve to wrap around the cabin. Inside, the dashboard control panel got another makeover and side-window defrosters were added.

Safety rules prompted more changes in 1974, from 5 mph-impact bumpers with energy-absorbers to the steering knuckle, which affected the car’s handling and stability should it encounter a tire blowout.

1975 saw the relocation of the turn signals in front from the upper front fender to the bumper. Fuel injection was introduced and a muffler added as well as a catalytic converter in California. The twin tailpipes were replaced with a single one. 1977 brought new front seats boasting separate head restraints. In 1979 convertible production ceased. 1979 was also the final year for the Beetle in the United States.

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