2016 Nissan LEAF
20,646 Miles | Lakewood, CO
$15,401
Est $222/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2014 Nissan LEAF
55,694 Miles | Denver, CO
$14,999
Est $216/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2017 Nissan LEAF
5,628 Miles | Centennial, CO
$15,994
Est $231/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2017 Nissan LEAF
22,823 Miles | Denver, CO
$15,999
Est $231/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2017 Nissan LEAF
24,052 Miles | Highlands Ranch, CO
$15,400
Est $222/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2015 Nissan LEAF
14,762 Miles | Doral, FL
$9,798
Est $141/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2015 Nissan LEAF
39,397 Miles | Doral, FL
$10,798
Est $156/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2013 Nissan LEAF
55,306 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$8,425
Est $121/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2017 Nissan LEAF
21,174 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$15,530
Est $224/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2014 Nissan LEAF
25,389 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$11,605
Est $167/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2015 Nissan LEAF
22,027 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$12,030
Est $173/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2015 Nissan LEAF
28,942 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$10,280
Est $148/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2015 Nissan LEAF
29,216 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$10,230
Est $147/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2014 Nissan LEAF
27,517 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$10,970
Est $158/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2016 Nissan LEAF
26,375 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$11,980
Est $173/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2013 Nissan LEAF
42,440 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$9,220
Est $133/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2014 Nissan LEAF
39,103 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$9,170
Est $132/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2011 Nissan LEAF
11,907 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$7,975
Est $115/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2016 Nissan LEAF
14,300 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$15,900
Est $229/mo

Track Price Check Availability

2016 Nissan LEAF
25,470 Miles | South San Francisco, CA
$13,725
Est $198/mo

Track Price Check Availability

Nissan LEAF Buyer's Guide

Owner Reviews
4.3
23 Reviews
Overall
4.3
Value
4.4
Performance
4.0
Style
3.5
Comfort
4.3
Fuel Economy
4.8
Reliability
4.6

Nissan LEAF Owner Ratings & Reviews

Write a Review

2015 Nissan LEAF - Worth going electric

DeePax
Sammamish, Washington
Overall
4.0
Value
4.0
Performance
4.0
Style
2.0
Comfort
3.0
Fuel Economy
5.0
Reliability
4.0
This is the second Leaf I have purchased. It takes some getting used to driving an electric car but once you do its hard to imagine going back. I rely solely on the charger that came with my car even though you can purchase a faster charger. It has a lot of techie extras which I didn't think I would need but I actually love. Bluetooth, keyless entry, GPS. Driving the car doesn't feel like an electric car and I have been in gas cars with less pick up. Going uphill there is plenty of power but it does use quite a bit of the charge. I live up a hill which has caused problems since its the end of my drive and if I'm running close to running out the hill makes it unpredictable and that makes me nervous. The other thing to be aware is that you use quite a bit more power when the heater is ru... (more)
Story
When I first go the car I would get stopped all the time to talk about it and whenever anyone new gets in it they always comment on the quiet.
Pros
The keyless entry in awesome and the seat warmers in front and back are loved by all. I also love how it feels to drive and its so quiet too.
Cons
Running low on charge is very stressful. There are no road trips in this car.

2015 Nissan LEAF -

LEAF owner
New York, New York
Overall
5.0
Value
5.0
Performance
4.0
Style
4.0
Comfort
4.0
Fuel Economy
5.0
Reliability
4.0
Its an amazing city car because it thrives in the city. It is quiet, efficient, and fast when I need it. Long trips are not a problem as long as there are charging stations nearby. The car lives up to its mileage claims. The car charges just fine on a 110v outlet. I know I can leave the car charged overnight and I know it will be ready to go when I wake up in the morning. I think the noise that it makes when backing up is a bit silly and annoying, but I think I can give it a pass for safety reasons. I think it is an excellent, no frills car that gets me from A to B and only costs me the electricity that it takes to charge it. No longer do I have to wait at gas station and pay outrageous prices for fuel!
Story
I had someone who I did not know come up and ask me what kind of car that I had because the person looked like they had never seen the Nissan Leaf before. I thought it was funny and memorable.
Pros
Quiet at speed Composed handling Roomy cabin Hands-free text messaging Standard B-Mode drive mode
Cons
Limited highway passing power Base model’s long charge time The sound it makes when one backs up can be annoying.

2015 Nissan LEAF - My journey

Douglas
Buffalo, New York
Overall
5.0
Value
5.0
Performance
4.0
Style
4.0
Comfort
5.0
Fuel Economy
4.0
Reliability
4.0
For 2015, the Nissan Leaf adds a more aggressive regenerative braking mode to the base model, and there may be a voice-to-text messaging and navigation voice command to SV and SL models. The SV also now gets 17-inch wheel, and I like it very much. The Leaf can travel 84 miles on a full battery charge. That may not sound like a lot, and for long-range suburban commuters without access to a charging station, it may not be. But it's enough range for most in- and around-town driving and short commutes, and still ranks as one of the highest in its class. I use lot of cars but really like this Nissan.
Pros
Low cost, flexibility, smooth, enjoyable, quality tire, and safety procedure.

Nissan LEAF Generations

The Nissan Leaf is a compact, fully-electric five-door hatchback currently in its second generation. It was the first fully-electric, mass-market vehicle from a major automaker when it debuted for the 2010 model year. Since then it's become the world's best-selling highway-capable EV.

2018 - Present (Second Generation) ZE1

The new generation of Nissan Leaf debuted in 2017 for the 2018 model year. It featured the same compact, five-door hatchback layout as its predecessor and remains front-wheel drive.

The Leaf is powered by a 148 horsepower synchronous electric motor with a single-speed transmission. The battery was now a 40 kWh lithium-ion battery with an official EPA range of 151 miles on a single charge.

Nissan gave this second generation a thorough redesign, chipping away at the first model’s rounded shape and giving it sharper lines and a lower roof profile.

This Leaf also has Nissan’s optional ProPilot system. It’s a driver-assist system that can help keep the vehicle in its lane and can use adaptive cruise control to stay a set distance from the vehicle in front of it — without driver interference. If the vehicle in front begins braking, the system will also brake and even come to a complete stop if necessary.

Another driver-assist feature is the e-Pedal, which applies regenerative braking force when the driver takes their foot off the gas pedal, slowing the car down. This allows the driver to essentially do one-foot driving around town.

Other optional tech includes auto emergency braking, lane-departure warning, blind-spot warning and a 360-degree surround-view camera.

Eight colors were available on this generation of Leaf.

Three trims of Leaf were offered in this generation: the S, SV and SL. The S trim remained the base trim, and it offered a five-inch infotainment display, Bluetooth capability, cruise control, adjustable driver's seat, climate control and e-Pedal with hill-hold. The SV adds 17-inch wheels, a larger, seven-inch infotainment screen, Android and iOS compatibility, navigation, leather-wrapped steering wheel and a six-speaker audio system. The SL trim is the highest trim, and it includes heated front seats, leather seats, a Bose seven-speaker system and a portable charging cable.

2010 - 2017 (First Generation) ZE0

The Nissan Leaf was the first mainstream, mass-market, fully-electric vehicle made by a major automaker.

The first generation of Leaf was a front-motor and front-wheel drive layout built on the Nissan EV platform. It ran a 110 horsepower synchronous electric motor with a single speed constant ratio transmission. The early models of this generation had a top speed over 93 mph.

Initially, Nissan stated that the Leaf had a range of 109 miles for the 2011 and 2012 model years. The EPA however, found that the range was actually only 73 miles. Further test drives found that the range could vary as much as 40 percent in real life situations. It depended on several factors, including load, driving style, traffic, weather and use of car accessories or air conditioning.

The 2013 model improved several aspects of the vehicle's systems, but only achieved an EPA range rating of 75 miles. The 2014 and 2015 Leafs improved to 84 miles of range. In 2016, Nissan added a larger battery for the SL and SV trims and eventually for the base trim as well. This battery boosted its official EPA range to 107 miles.

To maximize efficiency, the Leaf featured several aerodynamic features, including a sharp V-style on the front of the vehicle and up-slanted LED headlights that help redirect airflow from the side mirrors. The bottom of the car also features aerodynamic paneling.

The wheelbase was 106.3 inches with an overall length of 175 inches. The width was 69.7 inches and the height was 61 inches. The car weighed between 3,291 and 3,391 pounds depending on the trim.

The main battery is 24 kWh with 192 total cells arranged in stacks of four cells. Along with the primary battery, the Leaf also features a 12-volt lead-acid battery to power the accessories and computers. The main battery was expected to lose some capacity over time, but Nissan stated it was capable of lasting a good ten years with average use.

Due to some conflicts over battery life, Nissan extended the battery warranty for 2011 through 2013 Leaf model years. Another conflict came with the Leaf's quoted range.

Charging ports for the Leaf varied over the different models. The ports are located on the front of the car. Before 2016, the two lower trims of Leaf came with standard charging, and the top trim came with DC fast charging capability. In late 2016, Nissan equipped all trims of Leaf with both charging receptacles. A standard household outlet and the supplied cable will give the Leaf about 5 miles in an hour, which fits general commuter use and the average 21 hours per day that such a vehicle is parked.

Nissan LEAF Pricing Analysis

Active Listings
Mileage

January 2019 Nationwide Nissan LEAF Prices

Nissan LEAF News

Industry Studies